ABOUT MOSAICS

The origin of the mosaic technique dates back to 3000 a.C. and it’s defined as the “Real Painting for Eternity” by G. Vasari, since you can look at mosaic works that were made centuries ago but still maintain their original characteristics.

Eternity exerts a timeless fascination on human beings, I have been analyzing the details of materials and techniques for mosaics to be the most long-lasting, possibly everlasting… and I eventually came to the conclusion that we all are the sum of an “infinite and immortal” soul and an “imperfect and finite” body.

Hence my late choice of getting rid of the classical schemes, rather going for both durable materials, such as marble and glaze, and disposable components, such as woods, textiles, paper, organic elements as well as metals, plastic and various objects. I try to make a bridge from all of this, a connection between classic and contemporary mosaic, ancient and modern, infinite and finite.

ACCORDING TO MY MANY EXPERIENCE I COULD EXAMINE IN DEPTH THE FOUR MOST POPULAR MOSAIC TECHNIQUES:

DIRECT TECHNIQUE:

the mosaic is made on a mortar layer which takes some hours to dry; the tiles and other components are applied directly. The variations and differences between the materials can create a range of developments which include three-dimensional effects.

DIRECT TECHNIQUE ON TEMPORARY SUPPORT:

the mosaic is made directly on a temporary lime support which needs to be constantly hidrated. Once the work is done, a gauze drenched in soluble glue is applied onto the surface of the mosaic; once the glue is dried the mosaic is ripped off and glued on its final support. When done, the gauze is removed with a wet sponge.

INDIRECT TECHNIQUE:

the tiles, which need to have the same thickness, are attached back to front to the drawing copied or printed on paper, and positioned under a plastic transparent sheet. Then, they are glued with a weak flour or soluble glue. A modern alternative to glue is using a sheet of adhesive plastic.
When the work is done, it’s covered with a plastic mesh drenched in vynil glue. Subsequently the plastic (or paper) is removed from the right surface of the work and the mosaic can be positioned on its final support. This technique is very suitable for floor or wall mosaics which require a completely flat surface.

DIRECT TECHNIQUE ON MESH:

this is a variation of the direct technique on temporary support. First the drawing is set a plastic transparent sheet which is then covered with a thinck plastic mesh. Then the mortar is gradually cast, and the tiles are set on the mesh support directly, following the original drawing below.

ARTISTIC

contemporary mosaics made by mixing materials in mixed media.

PORTRAIT & REMAKE

unauthorized reproductions of photographic portraits or existing paintings.

OBJECT

The art of mosaics applied to your home furnishings.